Catalog Selections

Hippos Remain Calm

Sandra Boynton

Hippos have a reputation for wild parties that go on till dawn. People have even gone so far as to say that partying hippos “go berserk.” Nobody knows how these rumors got started. But even if it’s true (it is), it’s not the whole story. Given the deep appreciation that hippos have for water, it’s no wonder that your average hippopotamus seeks, finds, and offers a state of flow, no matter the situation. We have much to learn from their example. Accordingly, this helpful book follows two typical hippos as they calmly and mindfully go about their ordinary hippo day.

A Tempest of Tea

Hafsah Faizal

On the streets of White Roaring, Arthie Casimir is a criminal mastermind and collector of secrets. Her prestigious tearoom transforms into an illegal bloodhouse by night, catering to the vampires feared by society. But when her establishment is threatened, Arthie is forced to strike an unlikely deal with an alluring adversary to save it—she can’t do the job alone.

Calling on some of the city’s most skilled outcasts, Arthie hatches a plan to infiltrate the sinister, glittering vampire society known as the Athereum. But not everyone in her ragtag crew is on her side, and as the truth behind the heist unfolds, Arthie finds herself in the midst of a conspiracy that will threaten the world as she knows it. Dark, action-packed, and swoonworthy, this is Hafsah Faizal better than ever.

I Hope This Doesn’t Find You

Ann Liang

Channeling her frustrations into email drafts–ones that she’d never send–seemingly perfect Sadie Wen finds her carefully crafted, conflict-free life turned upside down when the email is sent out accidentally, and the only person growing to appreciate the ‘real’ Sadie is the only boy she’s sworn to hate.

Dear Black Girls: how to be true to you

A'ja Wilson

From Olympic gold medalist and two-time professional basketball MVP A’ja Wilson comes an inspirational collection on what it means to grow up as a Black girl in America. This is a book for all the girls with an apostrophe in their name. This is for all the girls who are “too loud” and “too emotional.” This is for all the girls who are constantly asked, “Oh, what did you do with your hair? That’s new.” This is for my Black girls. In this empowering and deeply personal collection-adapted from and expanded upon the piece of the same name in The Players’ Tribune-WNBA star A’ja Wilson shares stories from her life. Despite gold medals, championships, and a list of accolades, Wilson knows how it feels to be swept under the rug. To not be heard, to not feel seen, to not be taken seriously. As a fourth grader going to a primarily white school in South Carolina, she was told she’d have to stay outside for a classmate’s birthday party. “Huh?” she asked. Because the birthday girl’s father didn’t like Black people. Wilson tells stories like this: stories that held her down but didn’t stop her. She shares her contribution to “The Talk,” and how to keep fighting, all while igniting strength, resilience, and passion. Dear Black Girls is one remarkable author’s necessary and meaningful exploration of what it means to be a Black woman in America today-and an of-the-moment rally cry to lift up women and girls everywhere.

Seeds of Change

Nina Laden

Rhyming text illustrates how small acts become powerful seeds that improve oneself and the community.

Heroes

Alan Gratz

December 6, 1941: Best friends Frank and Stanley have it good. Their dads are Navy pilots stationed at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, and the boys get a front-row view of the huge battleships and the sparkling water. Yes, World War II is raging in Europe and in Asia, but the US isn’t involved in the war, and the boys are free to dream about becoming comic book creators. They’ve even invented a superhero of their own, in the style of Batman, Superman, Captain America, and other stars of the Golden Age of Comics. Maybe they’ll even get their comic published someday. December 7th, 1941: Everything explodes. That morning, Frank and Stanley are aboard the battleship the USS Utah when Japanese planes zoom overhead and begin dropping bombs on the ships below. Chaos ensues as everyone scrambles to dive for safety. Frank and Stanley realize what’s happening: Japan is attacking America! The war has come to them. As the boys fight to make their way home amidst the carnage, it’s clear that everything has changed. Stanley’s mother is Japanese American and he is suddenly facing a terrible prejudice that he’s never known before–he’s now seen as the “enemy,” and Frank, who’s white, cannot begin to understand what Stanley will now face. Can their friendship–and their dreams–survive this watershed moment in history?

Cranky

Phuc Tran

Cranky is feeling, well, cranky. But don’t ask why. Because you know what doesn’t help when you’re feeling cranky? Everyone asking you what’s wrong! Is there anything that will help? Find out in this irresistible story about big trucks, big feelings, and even bigger friendships.

Lucky Duck

Greg Pizzoli

Susan the duck keeps feeling unlucky, so when a wolf shows up with gifts she has won it seems like her luck is turning around, but soon she realizes the wolf’s intentions may not be as helpful as she imagined.

Are You Big?

Mo Willems

Are YOU big? A simple question sends readers to the far reaches of the universe.

Treehouse Town

Gideon Sterer

A child explores the magical world of Treehouse Town–from Sap Street to Willow Way–where all children and animal inhabitants work together and have fun.